Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/227119
Title:
(Re)connecting politics? Parliament, the public and the Internet
Authors:
Lusoli, Wainer; Ward, Stephen; Gibson, Rachel
Abstract:
Much concern has been voiced about the ability of UK parliamentary institutions and elected representatives to respond to twenty-first century politics. Consequently, there has been an increasing focus around the need to modernise representative politics and re-engage public interest in democratic institutions. Perhaps not surprisingly, the emergence of the internet and email, has been seized upon as one potential solution to public disconnection from parliament. This article examines the extent to which new media can: open up new channels of communication between MPs and the public and whether it could widen/deepen participation in parliamentary politics. To answer such questions, the paper draws on public opinion survey data which assesses: the extent of current usage of parliamentary websites; whether there is a new audience using online communication; the comparative value of different forms of communication with representatives; the demand for online parliamentary consultation and participation; and attitudes towards use of new media in the parliamentary politics. It concludes by suggesting that whilst new media technologies have potential, without wider changes to parliamentary politics, they are just as likely to reinforce existing participation patterns.
Affiliation:
University of Chester ; University of Oxford ; Australian National University
Citation:
Parliamentary Affairs, 2005, 59(1), pp. 24 -42
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
Parliamentary Affairs
Issue Date:
Jan-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/227119
DOI:
10.1093/pa/gsj010
Additional Links:
http://pa.oxfordjournals.org
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This article is not available through ChesterRep.
ISSN:
0031-2290; 1460-2482
Sponsors:
This article was submitted to the RAE2008 for the University of Chester - Social Work and Social Policy & Administration.; Two-year project funded by the Economic & Social Research Council.
Appears in Collections:
Social Studies and Counselling

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLusoli, Waineren_GB
dc.contributor.authorWard, Stephenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGibson, Rachelen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-06-01T11:05:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-06-01T11:05:31Z-
dc.date.issued2006-01-
dc.identifier.citationParliamentary Affairs, 2005, 59(1), pp. 24 -42en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0031-2290-
dc.identifier.issn1460-2482-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/pa/gsj010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/227119-
dc.descriptionThis article is not available through ChesterRep.en_GB
dc.description.abstractMuch concern has been voiced about the ability of UK parliamentary institutions and elected representatives to respond to twenty-first century politics. Consequently, there has been an increasing focus around the need to modernise representative politics and re-engage public interest in democratic institutions. Perhaps not surprisingly, the emergence of the internet and email, has been seized upon as one potential solution to public disconnection from parliament. This article examines the extent to which new media can: open up new channels of communication between MPs and the public and whether it could widen/deepen participation in parliamentary politics. To answer such questions, the paper draws on public opinion survey data which assesses: the extent of current usage of parliamentary websites; whether there is a new audience using online communication; the comparative value of different forms of communication with representatives; the demand for online parliamentary consultation and participation; and attitudes towards use of new media in the parliamentary politics. It concludes by suggesting that whilst new media technologies have potential, without wider changes to parliamentary politics, they are just as likely to reinforce existing participation patterns.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThis article was submitted to the RAE2008 for the University of Chester - Social Work and Social Policy & Administration.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipTwo-year project funded by the Economic & Social Research Council.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://pa.oxfordjournals.orgen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Parliamentary Affairsen_GB
dc.subjectInterneten_GB
dc.subjectpoliticsen_GB
dc.title(Re)connecting politics? Parliament, the public and the Interneten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; University of Oxford ; Australian National Universityen_GB
dc.identifier.journalParliamentary Affairsen_GB
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