Co-delivery of higher level learning and role perceptions: A practitioner research study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/205594
Title:
Co-delivery of higher level learning and role perceptions: A practitioner research study
Authors:
Wall, Tony; Meakin, Denise
Abstract:
Models of higher education which support personal and organisational transformation have emerged in various forms over time. One of these forms has been the negotiated, work-based learning framework which allow learners to integrate interdisciplinary study into their work activity. Such frameworks remain as innovative approaches for learning, and are more widely recognised than ever before. So much so, more and more learning and development departments of public, private and voluntary sector organisations are seeking recognition of their in-house training courses – so trainees can be awarded university credits or awards upon successful completion of a training experience. Although this may be seen as an innovative form of widening access and diversity in universities, it is also a strategic recognition that higher level learning is facilitated out of the classroom, in the workplace, in an applied setting (professional knowledge, ‘mode 2’ learning). In designing and delivering this provision, staff from the organisation offering the training (called Associate Tutors) and the university (called Associate Tutor Advisor) work together in a close relationship to ensure adherence to quality assurance standards, requirements and processes. Even though this is a growing area within higher education, this relationship is un-researched, and this paper raises important questions. Overall, this paper investigates how staff from organisations providing such training perceive their role: Do they see themselves as trainers? Do they see themselves as academics of the University? A hybrid? Or both? This paper draws data from innovative practice through a qualitative action based research methodology. It is argued that Associate Tutors can primarily see themselves as delivering a commercial training service with a brand-value, which is focused on a ‘mode 1’ transmission of knowledge – whereas the teaching, learning and assessment activities associated with being an academic in higher education is a secondary consideration. The implications and challenges of these perceptions are shared, discussed and critiqued in order to further develop innovative practice in facilitating partnerships for mode 2 knowledge creation, outside of universities.
Affiliation:
University of Chester
Citation:
Unpublished conference presentation given at the International CARN Conference in Vienna, Austria, 4-6 November 2011
Issue Date:
6-Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/205594
Additional Links:
http://ius.uni-klu.ac.at/carn
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
Description:
This unpublished conference paper is available at http://chester.academia.edu/cwrstony/Papers/1303984/Co-Delivery_of_Higher_Level_Learning_and_Role_Perceptions_A_Practitioner_Research_Study
Appears in Collections:
Centre for Work Related Studies

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWall, Tonyen
dc.contributor.authorMeakin, Deniseen
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-30T10:48:49Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-30T10:48:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-06-
dc.identifier.citationUnpublished conference presentation given at the International CARN Conference in Vienna, Austria, 4-6 November 2011en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/205594-
dc.descriptionThis unpublished conference paper is available at http://chester.academia.edu/cwrstony/Papers/1303984/Co-Delivery_of_Higher_Level_Learning_and_Role_Perceptions_A_Practitioner_Research_Studyen
dc.description.abstractModels of higher education which support personal and organisational transformation have emerged in various forms over time. One of these forms has been the negotiated, work-based learning framework which allow learners to integrate interdisciplinary study into their work activity. Such frameworks remain as innovative approaches for learning, and are more widely recognised than ever before. So much so, more and more learning and development departments of public, private and voluntary sector organisations are seeking recognition of their in-house training courses – so trainees can be awarded university credits or awards upon successful completion of a training experience. Although this may be seen as an innovative form of widening access and diversity in universities, it is also a strategic recognition that higher level learning is facilitated out of the classroom, in the workplace, in an applied setting (professional knowledge, ‘mode 2’ learning). In designing and delivering this provision, staff from the organisation offering the training (called Associate Tutors) and the university (called Associate Tutor Advisor) work together in a close relationship to ensure adherence to quality assurance standards, requirements and processes. Even though this is a growing area within higher education, this relationship is un-researched, and this paper raises important questions. Overall, this paper investigates how staff from organisations providing such training perceive their role: Do they see themselves as trainers? Do they see themselves as academics of the University? A hybrid? Or both? This paper draws data from innovative practice through a qualitative action based research methodology. It is argued that Associate Tutors can primarily see themselves as delivering a commercial training service with a brand-value, which is focused on a ‘mode 1’ transmission of knowledge – whereas the teaching, learning and assessment activities associated with being an academic in higher education is a secondary consideration. The implications and challenges of these perceptions are shared, discussed and critiqued in order to further develop innovative practice in facilitating partnerships for mode 2 knowledge creation, outside of universities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://ius.uni-klu.ac.at/carnen
dc.subjectwork based learningen
dc.subjectaccreditationen
dc.titleCo-delivery of higher level learning and role perceptions: A practitioner research studyen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chesteren
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