Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/115305
Title:
Teaching managers: Learning, research and workplace practice
Authors:
Rowland, Caroline; Hall, Roger
Abstract:
This article explores the way in which professional management programmes are informed by research and workplace practice. The focus is on the areas of motivation, appraisal and the management of change. A longitudinal study using a mixed methods approach was used. Middle and senior managers engaged on professional management programmes were surveyed on workplace practice. Literature reviewed included syllabus guidelines from professional bodies and selected core textbooks. A content analysis revealed that there was a lack of congruence between what is taught to managers and workplace practice. However, research was found to have an impact on teaching and indirectly it influenced individual beliefs if not organisational practice. Conclusions indicate that professional management programmes are still failing to bridge the gap between syllabus content current research and workplace practice. There is little to show that the needs of Business are being satisfied compared to successful models embedded in other professions.
Affiliation:
University of Chester ; Hall Consultancy
Citation:
Journal of Management Development, 2010, 29(9), pp. 828-839
Publisher:
Emerald
Journal:
Journal of Management Development
Issue Date:
Sep-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10034/115305
DOI:
10.1108/02621711011072522
Additional Links:
http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/02621711011072522
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Description:
This is the author's PDF version of an article published in Journal of Management Development ©2010. The definitive version is available at www.emeraldinsight.com.
ISSN:
0262-1711
Appears in Collections:
University of Chester Business School

Full metadata record

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorRowland, Carolineen
dc.contributor.authorHall, Rogeren
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-10T14:14:11Z-
dc.date.available2010-11-10T14:14:11Z-
dc.date.issued2010-09-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Management Development, 2010, 29(9), pp. 828-839en
dc.identifier.issn0262-1711-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/02621711011072522-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10034/115305-
dc.descriptionThis is the author's PDF version of an article published in Journal of Management Development ©2010. The definitive version is available at www.emeraldinsight.com.en
dc.description.abstractThis article explores the way in which professional management programmes are informed by research and workplace practice. The focus is on the areas of motivation, appraisal and the management of change. A longitudinal study using a mixed methods approach was used. Middle and senior managers engaged on professional management programmes were surveyed on workplace practice. Literature reviewed included syllabus guidelines from professional bodies and selected core textbooks. A content analysis revealed that there was a lack of congruence between what is taught to managers and workplace practice. However, research was found to have an impact on teaching and indirectly it influenced individual beliefs if not organisational practice. Conclusions indicate that professional management programmes are still failing to bridge the gap between syllabus content current research and workplace practice. There is little to show that the needs of Business are being satisfied compared to successful models embedded in other professions.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/02621711011072522en
dc.subjectworkplace practiceen
dc.subjectperformance managementen
dc.subjectmanagement developmenten
dc.titleTeaching managers: Learning, research and workplace practiceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Chester ; Hall Consultancyen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Management Developmenten
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